INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT
SYLLABUS
Section Instructor: Dr. O'Connor or assigned instructor
This is a "master" syllabus and may not be your actual syllabus
Assigned instructors may or may not use this material

Class meets: as scheduled
Office Hours:
as scheduled
APSU Center @ Ft. Campbell

Telephone: (931) 221-1477
(931) 221-1493 (Fax)
Email: oconnort@apsu.edu
Website: www.drtomoconnor.com

policing book

Textbook: Dempsey, J. & Forst, L. (2011). An Introduction to Policing, 6e. Florence, KY: Delmar Cengage Learning. ISBN: 1111137722.

COURSE DESIGNATION: CRJ 1030 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3 semester hours)

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND PREREQUISITES: This course is a survey of the role of policing in society, including study of the historical evolution of the concepts and methods in policing, as well as analysis of the effectiveness of traditional and non-traditional techniques of law enforcement control of crime, disorder, and decay. (no prerequisites)

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1. To acquire an informed understanding of the basic concepts in policing
2. To recognize the major sources of data on the effectiveness of policing
3. To examine the historical evolution of the role of policing in a modern society
4. To examine strategies, tactics, and methods in policing
5. To examine police systems and their role in democratic societies
6. To appreciate the basic differences between good and bad policing
7. To appreciate emerging and international forms of policing

GENERAL EDUCATION GOALS:

In addition to the above objectives, the more general goals of this course are to provide the student with the following tools to help develop his or her potential:
1. Development of the student's analytical thinking capabilities through comparison and contrast in the application of theories and concepts to social problems
2. Enhancement of the student's literacy skills through assigned readings, discussions, examinations, and other requirements
3. Utilization of the historical perspective which helps with student understanding of evolutionary developments over time
4. Understanding of the scientific method through research requirements and in-depth case studies
5. Improvement in social interaction skills and understanding human behavior through consideration of the impact legal and social systems have on individuals
6. Increased student awareness of cultural and multi-cultural issues through study of how social problems and social movements are related to, and affect, minority groups
7. Preparation for more advanced study in criminal justice/homeland security

CONTENT OUTLINE:

Week 1: Textbook chapters as announced, the following (recommended) Lecture Notes, and any other material the Instructor assigns.
1. Police History

Week 2: Textbook chapters as announced, the following (recommended) Lecture Notes, and any other material the Instructor assigns.
2. Police Structure and Organization

Week 3: Textbook chapters as announced, the following (recommended) Lecture Notes, and any other material the Instructor assigns.
3. Police Socialization

Week 4: Textbook chapters as announced, the following (recommended) Lecture Notes, and any other material the Instructor assigns.
4. Minorities in Policing

Week 5: Textbook chapters as announced, the following (recommended) Lecture Notes, and any other material the Instructor assigns.
5. Police Ethics and Deviance

Week 6: Textbook chapters as announced, the following (recommended) Lecture Notes, and any other material the Instructor assigns.
6. Police Operations

Week 7: Textbook chapters as announced, the following (recommended) Lecture Notes, and any other material the Instructor assigns.
7. Police Community Relations

Week 8: Textbook chapters as announced, the following (recommended) Lecture Notes, and any other material the Instructor assigns.
8. Police, Law, and Science

REQUIRED LEARNING RESOURCES:

Main Textbook/Required Textbook: Dempsey, J. & Forst, L. (2011). An Introduction to Policing, 6e. Florence, KY: Delmar Cengage Learning. ISBN: 1111137722 which contains the following chapters which should be read in order:
1. Police History
2. Organizing Public Security in the U.S.
3. Organizing the Police Department
4. Becoming a Police Officer
5. The Police Role and Discretion
6. Police Culture, Personality, and Stress
7. Minorities in Policing
8. Police Ethics and Deviance
9. Patrol Operations
10. Investigations
11. Police and the Community
12. Community Policing: The Debate
13. Police and the Law
14. Computers, Technology, and Criminalistics
15. Homeland Security

Supplemental Reference: American Psychological Association. (1994). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5e. Washington DC: APA. Note: students do not have to buy this book, but should have access to it or something similar in order to utilize the correct style or format with writing assignments.

Additional Learning Resources (Internet Links in lectures and these general resources)
1. Police Structure of the United States
(from CJ Megalinks)
2. The Police Component of Criminal Justice
(from CRJ1010 course)
3. PoliceOne.com
(news forum)
4. Officer.com
(news forum)
5. PoliceLink.com
(news forum)
6. Wikipedia Entry on Police
(quite long and good)

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Students are expected to read and follow the schedule in the course syllabus, to read assigned text chapters, to read assigned Lecture Notes, and to seek and read additional suggested resources as provided by the textbook and Instructor.  In addition, students are expected to be alert and attentive with note taking in class and have a demonstrated desire to participate in any discussion.  Exams are to be completed within the deadlines given by the Instructor, and any special instructions for the paper assignment are to be followed precisely.  The Instructor will announce all deadlines and instructions as well as provide reminders about the pace or flow of the course.

BASIS AND METHODS FOR GRADING (May vary by instructor):

25% Midterm Examination (objective test with essay questions that may count toward writing)
35% Final Examination (objective test with essay questions that may count toward writing)
25% Writing assignments (single or multiple assignments, the equivalent of 8 pages)
15% Participation and Discussion (attendance, logins, discussion contributions)

The grade scale used in this course is normally a 7-point scale, as follows, although instructors are free to make adjustments or modifications as circumstances permit. At times when circumstances permit, the scale may be dropped to a 10-point scale, or slightly more.

A = 93-100
B = 86-92
C = 78-85
D = 70-77
F = 69/below

ATTENDANCE POLICY: An attendance roster is kept (and login records, if this is a web-based course), and students are expected to attend all sessions on time and as scheduled. If a session and/or assignment deadline is to be missed for circumstances beyond the student's control, prior permission of the instructor must be obtained, and arrangements made for submission of the work. Regular late submission of work as well as tardiness and absenteeism will result in reduction of the final grade by at least one letter, depending upon severity. An "Incomplete" can only be given if the student has normally completed at least half the coursework, has a reasonable justification, and makes arrangements with the instructor.

DISABILITY POLICY: Any student who has a disability that may affect his/her academic performance is encouraged to make an appointment with me to discuss this matter, or you may contact Disability Services; telephone 221-6230; voice 221-6278; voice tty.

POLICY ON MINORS: Minors (any non-student under the age of 18) accompanying staff, faculty, students, or visitors on campus are not permitted in the classroom.

ACADEMIC AND CLASSROOM MISCONDUCT: Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately at all times. Academic and classroom misconduct will not be tolerated. Students must read the "Code of Student Conduct" in the new Student Handbook for an understanding of what will be expected of them within the academic setting. Cheating and plagiarism will not be tolerated, and any student found cheating or plagiarizing will receive an "F" for the work in question, and possibly an "F" for the course, and may be recommended for suspension from the University.  Cheating is defined as not working on exams or assignments alone, and plagiarism is defined as taking the work of someone else's as one's own.  APSU uses software that will identify plagiarism.

The above schedule and procedures are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

Last updated: Apr. 16, 2012
Not an official webpage of APSU, copyright restrictions apply, see Megalinks in Criminal Justice
O'Connor, T.  (2012). "Syllabus for Introduction to Law Enforcement," MegaLinks in Criminal Justice. Retrieved from http://www.drtomoconnor.com/1030/default.htm.