Graduate Education in Criminal Justice:
A STATE-BY-STATE GUIDE

[Doctoral Programs][Master's Programs][Bachelor's Program]

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   If you have a half-decent grade point average (generally, no lower than 2.5; the higher the better), an average or above-average score on the GRE, and can get good letters of recommendation, you should consider applying to graduate school in criminal justice or criminology (criminal justice and criminology are pretty much interchangeable at the graduate level).  There's a real shortage of people with graduate degrees in this field.  Remember the application deadline for most places is January, or March at the latest.  The main thing is to sign up to take the GRE (Click on the GRE initials and register NOW if you haven't already).  This web page is primarily about traditional, residential programs in criminal justice, and if you are dead-set interested in something else, the following OTHER site, Distance Ed in CJ MegaLinks, may be more helpful.

    Let me give you some plain and simple advice about graduate education in criminal justice.  If you do it right, a masters degree in CJ takes less time to complete than a Bachelor's degree (and a doctorate even less time, if you don't drop out and go ABD - which stands for All But Dissertation).  Graduate education is also cheaper in cost (at most places), and you are at no time more prepared than now, at the end of your undergraduate education.  I strongly urge you to consider enrolling somewhere NOW, and not waiting until you're a non-traditional, older student.  Personally, I worked in the real world for at least five years between each of my degrees, and I didn't regret it, but it was an uphill battle against the hidden discrimination against nontraditionals and those with long and continuous real-world experience (which doesn't matter all that much in academia).  You'll find that the more common (and respected) pattern, especially among the senior faculty and administrators at most schools is to be a whiz kid and get your Ph.D. by the time you're 27 or younger.  At least, that's what professor families expect of their kids.  To succeed, the main thing you'll need, besides smarts, is willpower, staying power, and the ability to get along with difficult people, particularly professor-type people. You must aspire to that advanced degree with all your heart and be willing to persevere no matter what.  It's nearly impossible to hide out in a graduate program, and hope nobody notices your character flaws as long as you get good grades.  This is especially true of doctoral programs, and the reason is because they are credentialing you for the teaching profession, and they take their gatekeeper role quite seriously.  Expect to be challenged like psychic warfare on all fronts.  A word of advice, don't even think about going to grad school and holding down a job or raising a family at the same time.  It won't work for 99.9% of the people who try it.  You have to devote 110% of attention to your studies.  Further, if you are so desperate for money (which you will be), that at some point half-way or more in your graduate studies, you think you qualify to answer one of those 650 ads for criminal justice professors needed every year, don't do it.  Stay with the program and finish it.  Don't become one of those thousands of half-finished 50-year old professors in our field stuck in some dead-end position somewhere as an adjunct or permanently untenured, "visiting" assistant something-or-other. 

    Now, let me be even more blunt and give you some pointed advice.  Pay careful attention to what you are getting your degree in.  What appears on the transcript is what matters.  The top of the transcript (when you graduate) will clearly indicate what you are got your degree in, and the coursework on your transcript will have a prefix code.  Those prefix codes should read something like CJ, CRJ, CJS, JUS, JPS or CRIM.  If you have those (or similar) codes on more than 80% of your coursework, congratulations, you received exactly the right kind of credits to be credentialed to teach in criminal justice.  However, if those codes read something like SOC, POL, LS, or PSY, then sorry, you're credentialed in another field, and the best you can hope for is to be an "interloper" who takes a teaching job away from someone who probably better deserves your position.  A long, long time ago, it used to be that other fields like Sociology and Political Science "adopted" us, but thank you now, criminal justice has grown into it's own and you can step aside now.  You'll discover a variety of names for criminal justice programs, and many will have "hybrid" names like the Department of Sociology, Social Work, Geography, and Criminal Justice, or "two-discipline" names like Sociology and Criminal Justice, Political Science and Criminal Justice, Social Work and Criminal Justice, Education and Human Services, or Justice and Public Policy.  Then, you'll find plain old Sociology departments and the like offering what they call a "concentration" or "specialization" in Criminal Justice.  Those kind of degrees are designed for people seeking unique job positions, not for teaching.  Finally, there are one-department programs that are true Criminal Justice programs, but they go under a different name, like Social Ecology, Justice Studies, Criminology, and a small number that are called Legal Studies or even Social Justice.  The bitter truth is that 60% of the criminal justice discipline is "captivated" like this in the "wrong" academic department, and it's "wrong" for the following reasons: (a) the administrators there are capitalizing on the growing enrollments and popularity of criminal justice to make up for declining enrollments in other fields; (b) the instructors in such programs "think" they're qualified simply because part of their dissertation, comp exams, or study touched on something to do with crime and justice; (c) they once worked in law enforcement, courts, or corrections, and "think" this experience counts, or should count as equally as true academic credits.  Experience does count in various ways, but there's no substitute for a good, old-fashioned education in just the right area.

THE DANGER OF COMPARING SCHOOLS

    I get a lot of requests from people who want a ranking of the grad schools in terms of reputation, quality, or prestige.  I also get a lot of emails asking me to help someone decide between this school and that school.  Be advised that I don't provide information or advice on either matter.  This is a highly controversial area plagued with conceptualization and measurement problems, and it's my policy not to respond to such requests.  Besides, I don't think I could do it in an unbiased fashion.  I would be tempted to say something like "the good schools must be ones with all that money to spend on advertising" (which to a certain extent is as good an indicator as any).  The simple truth is that:  all graduate schools which are set up the right way in this field have about the same attrition rate (high), the same difficulty level (high), the same egos involved (enormous), and the same chances of employment when you graduate (it depends on the market that year).  Programs rapidly shift from year to year in response to curriculum reviews, reaccreditations, university politics, and faculty turnover.  It is probably more important to consider the cost of living, quality of life, political climate and other factors such as assistant professor starting salaries in deciding which state and which school to select.

    You'll need to do your own research.  Find out the average number of students in residence, the number of graduates per year, and what those graduates are writing their theses and dissertations on.  Chances are you'll be joining some "cohort" of others who have applied that year, so try and get in touch with them, if you can.  Find out as much as you can about each department's emphasis (if any) and each professor's specialty (paying careful attention to their age, sabbatical and retirement plans, as well as where they're at on the tenure clock).  Some schools, however, have a well-known emphasis.  John Jay and Eastern Kentucky, for example, are known for their law enforcement emphasis, and Sam Houston State is known for its corrections emphasis, but often, these reputations as well as curricula change over the years.  

    Utilize printed resources in addition to what you find on the web, which may be misleading.  Peterson's Guide, Barron's Guide, and Arco's Guide are three of the most well-known catalogs and are easily found in any library or bookstore. For CJ specifically, see if your local library or career center has a copy of "Guide to Graduate Programs in Criminal Justice and Criminology" which details programs at more than 1000 institutions nationwide. The publisher is ACJS and for the last five years, they've been sold out of the book. They also publish a document called "Minimum Standards for CJ Education."  Another association you might want to look into is ASC

THE IMPORTANCE OF FACULTY EGOS

    Don't apply to a grad program if there is only one professor there who specializes in your interest, no matter if it seems like a perfect match. He or she may move, get sick, or take a sabbatical during your stay, and you will have trouble putting together a thesis or dissertation committee. The rule of thumb is to find a critical mass of dependable faculty (at least three) with some overlap in specialties and then choose a common topic but one that none of them feels too strongly about. Your thesis or dissertation is going to eventually revolve around THEIR interests, not yours, but all the ideas up front are going to have to come from you. Expect revisions for revision's sake. They're testing you.

    You need to know if your prospective committee members are compatible with one another and will protect you from department politics. The best way to find this out is through observation or hearsay, but you might be able to garner some impression by visiting faculty web pages or those of the universities themselves. There is also a special web site set up by the ASC (American Society of Criminology) for its student members called the E-mail Mentoring Directory, which allows you to contact professors who have volunteered to provide thoughtful advice to struggling grad students or grad student wannabes.  Use this list to find and ask questions from somebody in a particular specialty.  At least get to know our two professional associations: the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and attend a meeting, if nearby.

DOCTORAL AND MASTERS PROGRAMS

    Why not go all the way to the doctorate?  Criminal Justice is a big growth area; hundreds of new Ph.D.s are needed every year, and the supply simply doesn't meet the demand.  Go count the number of CJ professors wanted in the course of the year at the Chronicle of Higher Education and Higher Education Jobs (CJ is under Liberal Arts) and you'll see at least 300 job openings every year.  Only about 20 Ph.D.s are produced every year because at least half of the ten or so who matriculate into the 28 existing programs (a total of 280 doctoral students) drop out, fail out, or go off teaching in ABD status and never finish.  That makes it nice for those who already have their Ph.D. to move around, but it also says something about how we're failing to fill up the pipeline.  It also makes it easy for so-called interlopers in related fields, like sociology, to move in and find jobs for their glut of graduates.

    If you apply to places supporting both the master's and doctoral degree, and are planning to enter into full-time residency, you will find your progress towards the master's nothing less than phenomenal (two years or less, in what is called a "fast track").  You can then stay at that same school (without reapplying) and pursue the Ph.D. there (which will normally take only another two or three years). Warning: doctoral programs are quite harder than master's programs, requiring comp exams, strong quantitative skills (a conceptual and practical understanding of advanced statistics), strong writing skills (you may have to turn out two to three 20-page term papers per course per semester), strong verbal presentation skills, and in most cases, overseas fieldwork or translation of a foreign language, learning a computer programming language, and then there's the typical 400 page dissertation that has to be groundbreaking.  I don't mean to scare you, but many lives have been ruined with one or more of these requirements, especially the comp exams (which are a closed book, two or three day affair).  The most common reason for bombing out, however, is floundering on the dissertation.  Many people just can't get a dissertation going, either because of committee politics or because their topic just isn't doable or appropriate.  The most frequent reason, however, is that people just get desperate for a job near the end of their doctoral program, and they go ABD (All But Dissertation) on the job market.  Then, they end up teaching a whole lot of courses somewhere with no time to finish the dissertation.  There are no online or easy ways to get a doctorate in CJ.  It's just plain hard, and you better have all of your life affairs in order. 

    There are less hurdles or hoops to jump thru in a master's program - for example: fewer math/statistics courses, fewer term papers, and no foreign languages to learn.  Master's students normally choose between a thesis or non-thesis option. The thesis option is for those who want some preparation at what it would be like to produce the dissertation required for the Ph.D.  The non-thesis option is typically for those who wish to treat their master's degree as terminal (as high as they want to go) in preparation for a specific career. The smartest thing to do is pursue the non-thesis option since doctoral programs don't really care much about whether you did a master's thesis or not and most master's programs aren't truly set up to support thesis activities even though they claim to be.

THE FOLLOWING SCHOOLS OFFER THE PH.D. IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE:

American University, School of Public Affairs, Washington, DC 20016, 202-885-6000

Arizona State University, School of Justice Studies, Tempe, AZ 85287, 602-965-7684

Univ. of California-Irvine, Program in Social Ecology, Irvine, CA 92717, 714-856-6094

University of Cincinnati, Dept. of Criminal Justice, Cincinnati, OH 45221, 513-556-5827

Claremont Graduate School, Center for Politics and Policy, Claremont, CA 91711, 714-521-1148

Florida State University, School of Criminology, Tallahassee, FL 32306, 904-644-4050

George Mason University, Justice, Law and Crime Policy, Arlington, VA 22201, 703-993-8315

University of Illinois-Chicago, Dept. of CJ, 1007 W. Harrison, Chicago, IL 60607, 312-996-5262

Indiana University, Dept. of CJ, Bloomington, IN 47405, 812-855-9325

Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania, Dept. of Criminology, Indiana, PA 15705, 724-357-2720

John Jay College of CJ (CUNY), 899 Tenth Ave., New York, NY 10019, 212-237-8695

University of Delaware, Dept. of Sociology and CJ, Newark, DE 19716 302-451-2581

University of Maryland, Dept. of Criminology and CJ, College Park, MD 20742 301-405-4699

Michigan State University., School of CJ, East Lansing, MI 48824 517-355-2192

Univ. of Missouri-St. Louis, Dept. of Crim./CJ, St. Louis, MO 63121, 314-553-5031

University of Nebraska, CJ Dept., Omaha, NE 68182, 402-554-2610

North Dakota State University, CJ/Political Sci Dept., Fargo, ND 58105, 701-231-7033

Northeastern University, College of Criminal Justice, Boston, MA 02115, 617-437-3327

Pennsylvania State Univ., Sociology/AOJ Dept., University Park, PA 16802, 814-863-0078

Portland State University, CJ Program., Portland, OR 97207, 503-229-4014

Prairie View A&M University, Juvenile Justice Program, Prairie View, TX 77446, 936-857-4938

Rutgers University, School of CJ, Newark, NJ 07102, 201-648-5870

Sam Houston St. University, College of Criminal Justice, Huntsville, TX 77341, 409-294-1631

University of North Dakota, CJ Dept., Grand Forks, ND 58202, 701-777-2011

University of South Carolina, Criminology and CJ Dept., Columbia, SC 29208, 803-777-7065

University of South Florida, Criminology Dept., Tampa, FL 33620, 813-974-2815

Univ. of Southern Mississippi, AOJ Program, Hattiesburg, MS 39406, 601-266-4509

State University of New York (SUNY)-Albany, School of Criminal Justice, Albany, NY 12222, 518-442-5210

Temple University, CJ Dept., Philadelphia, PA 19122, 215-204-7918

Washington St. University, CJ Dept., Pullman, WA 99164, 509-335-2545

THE FOLLOWING SCHOOLS OFFER THE M.A. or M.S. IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE:

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[also, be sure to visit Ron Denny's Masters in Criminal Justice webpage]

ALABAMA

Andrew Jackson Univ., Criminal Justice Dept., Birmingham, AL 35209, 205-871-9288, a proctored exam and self-study program, a faculty of about 8 with interests in Law and Policy

Auburn University, Public Safety Dept., Montgomery, AL 36117, 205-244-3691, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Corrections, Policing, and Criminal Law

Faulkner University MCJ Online Dept., Montgomery, AL 37109, 334-386-7132, a faculty of about 4 with specialties in Law, Policing, and Corrections

Jacksonville St. Univ., College of CJ, Jacksonville, AL 36265, 205-782-5335, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Policing and Criminal Law

Troy Univ., MCJ Program, Troy, AL 36082, 334-670-3000, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology

Univ. Of Alabama, CJ Dept., Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, 205-348-7795, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, and Policy

Univ. of Alabama, CJ Dept., Birmingham, AL 35294, 205-934-2069, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology and Policy

Univ. of North Alabama
, Sociology and CJ Dept., Florence, AL 35632, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, Criminology, Juvenile Justice, and the Courts

ALASKA

Univ. of Alaska, Justice Ctr., Anchorage, AK 99508, 907-786-4608, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology

Univ. of Alaska, Justice Dept., Fairbanks, AK 99775, 907-474-5500, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Criminology

ARKANSAS

Univ. of Arkansas, CJ Dept., Little Rock, AR 72204, 501-569-3195, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, Criminology, and Law

ARIZONA

Arizona St. Univ., School of Justice Studies, Tempe, AZ 85287, 602-965-7684, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Legal Systems, Criminal Law, and Policy

Northern Arizona Univ., Sociology, SW and CJ Dept., Flagstaff, AZ 86011, 602-523-1520, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Applied Sociology and Criminology

CALIFORNIA

California St. Univ., Criminology Dept., Fresno, CA 93740, 559-278-2305, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Criminology, Corrections, and Policing (with plans for a joint doctorate in Criminal Justice Sciences: Victimology, Forensic Behavioral Sciences, and Forensic Science options)

California St. Univ., CJ Division, Sacramento, CA 95819, 916-278-6487, a faculty of about 25 with specialties in Administration and Policy

California St. Univ., CJ Dept, San Bernardino, CA 92407, 714-880-5506, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Policing and Corrections

California St. Univ., CJ Dept, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA 95382, 209-667-3408, a faculty of about 9 with specialties in Corrections, Criminology, Law, Policy, and Policing

Claremont Grad. School, Center for Politics & Policy, Claremont, CA 91711, 714-621-1148, a faculty of about 12 with specialties in Criminology, Criminal Law, and Policy

San Diego St. Univ., Public Affairs Dept., San Diego, CA 92185, 619-594-5124, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Law, Criminology, and Corrections

San Jose St. Univ., Justice Studies Dept., San Jose, CA 95192, 408-924-2940, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, and Administration

Univ. of California, Sociology Dept., Berkeley, CA 94720, a faculty of about 20 with interests in Criminology and Law

Univ. of California, Program in Social Ecology, Irvine, CA 92717, a faculty of about 35 with specialties in Criminology, Law and Society

COLORADO

Univ. of Colorado, Sociology Dept., Boulder, CO 80309, 303-492-6427, a faculty of about 16 with interests in Delinquency and Policy

Univ. of Colorado, School of Public Affairs, Denver, CO 80204, 303-315-2228, a faculty of about 20 with interests in Policy, Law, and Administration

Univ. of Denver, Program in Legal Administration, Denver, CO 80220, 303-871-6308, a faculty of about 3 with interests in Court Administration

CONNECTICUT

Central Connecticut St. Univ, Criminology and Criminal Justice Dept., New Britain, CT 06050, 860-832-2278, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology, Law, and Policy

University of New Haven, Public Mgt. and Forensic Science Program, West Haven, CT 06516, 203-932-7116, a faculty of about 9 with specialties in Criminalistics and Administration

DELAWARE

Univ. of Delaware, Sociology and CJ Dept., Newark, DE 19716, 302-451-2581, a faculty of about 30 with specialties in Criminology, Psychology, and Police Ethics

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

American University, Justice, Law & Society Dept., Washington DC 20016, 202-885-2948, a faculty of about 19 with specialties in Criminology, Law, and Policing

George Washington Univ., CJ Dept., Washington, DC, 20052, 202-994-7319, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Laboratory Science and Criminalistics

FLORIDA

Florida Atlantic University, CJ Dept. Boca Raton, FL 33431, 954-236-1242, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Public Policy and Management

Florida International University, CJ Dept., North Miami, FL 33181, 305-940-5850, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Criminology and Policy

Florida St. University, School of Criminology, Tallahassee, FL 32306, 904-644-4050, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Criminology, Policing, the Courts, and Corrections

University of Central Florida, CJ & Legal Studies, Orlando, FL 32816, 407-823-2603, a faculty of about 23 with specialties in Criminology, Policing, the Courts, and Corrections

University of North Florida, Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice Dept., Jacksonville, FL 32224, 904-620-2850, a faculty of about 10 with interests in Crime and Criminology

University of South Florida, Criminology Dept., Tampa, FL 33620, 813-974-2815, a faculty of about 12 with specialties in Criminology, Policing, and Corrections

GEORGIA

Albany State College, CJ Dept., Albany, GA 31705, 912-430-4864, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, and Criminology

Armstrong Atlantic State University, (MS in CJ) Dept. of Government, Savannah, GA 31419, 912-927-5296, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Corrections, Policing, and Law

Georgia State University, CJ Dept., Atlanta, GA 30303, 404-651-3515, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, and Criminal Law

Valdosta State College, Sociology, Anthropology and CJ Dept., Valdosta, GA 31698, 912-333-5943, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Applied Sociology and Administration

HAWAII

University of Hawaii at Manoa, Sociology Dept., Honolulu, HI 96822, 808-956-7693, a faculty of about 20 with interests in Crime or Criminology

Chaminade University in Honolulu, Program in Criminal Justice Administration, Honolulu, HI, 96816, 808-735-4703, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Criminology

IDAHO

Boise State University, Criminal Justice Adm. Dept., Boise, ID 83725, 208-426-3407, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Policing, Courts, Corrections, and Criminology

ILLINOIS

Chicago State University, CJ Dept., Chicago, IL, 60628, 773-995-2108, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Law, Criminology, Corrections, and Administration

Illinois State University, CJ Dept., Normal, IL 61761, 309-438-7626, a faculty of about 13 with specialties in Criminology, Corrections, Policing, and Administration

Southern Illinois Univ., Administration of Justice Dept., Carbondale, IL 62901, 618-453-5701, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Delinquency, Geography, Policing, and Corrections

University of Illinois, CJ Dept., Chicago, IL 60680, 312-996-5262, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Policing, Policy, and Criminalistics

Western Illinois University, Law Enforcement Dept., Macomb, IL 61455, 309-298-1038, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Policing, Security, Corrections, Criminology, and Criminal Law

INDIANA

Indiana St. Univ., Criminology Dept., Terre Haute, IN 47809, 812-237-2190, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Corrections, Policing, and Criminal Law

Indiana University, CJ Dept., Bloomington, IN 47405, 812-855-9880, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Criminology, Criminal Law, Law and Society

Indiana University Northwest, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Gary, IN 46408, 219-980-6605, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Criminology and Administration

Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5152, 317-274-4656, a faculty of about 25 with specialties in Juvenile Justice, Criminology, Corrections, and Policing with undergrad programs at Indianapolis, Ft. Wayne, South Bend, Gary, and Kokomo. 

Indiana Purdue Ft. Wayne (IPFW), a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Administration.

IOWA

St. Ambrose University, CJ Dept., Davenport, IA 52803, 319-333-6175, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Administration and Policy

KANSAS

Washburn University, CJ Dept., Topeka, KS 66621, 785-231-1010, a faculty of about 9 with specialties in Corrections, Policy, Law, and Criminology

Wichita State Univ., CJ Dept., Wichita, KS 67208, 316-689-3710, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Administration, Policing, Corrections, and Criminology

KENTUCKY

Eastern Kentucky University, College of Justice and Safety, Richmond, KY 40475, 606-622-3565, a faculty of about 25 with specialties in Policing, Security, and Administration

University of Louisville, School of Justice Administration, Louisville, KY 40292, 502-588-6567, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Criminology, Policing and Corrections

LOUISIANA

Grambling St. Univ., CJ Dept., Grambling, LA 71245, 318-274-2746, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Criminology and Delinquency

Loyola Univ. New Orleans, CJ Dept., New Orleans, LA 70118, 504-865-3323, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology, Administration, and Policing 

Northeast LA Univ., CJ Dept., Monroe, LA 71209, 318-342-4026, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology, Delinquency and Corrections

Southern University, Dept. of Social Sciences, New Orleans, LA 70126, 504-286-5000, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Administration, Policing, and Corrections. This school also operates a growing Baton Rouge campus that plans to offer the Masters in CJ soon. Many people from this region put together a Ph.D. program from one of the majors at LSU in Baton Rouge

MARYLAND

University of Baltimore, Division of Criminology, Criminal Justice & Social Policy, Baltimore, MD, 21201, 410-837-6087, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology and Policy

University of Maryland, Dept. of CJ and Criminology, College Park, MD 20742, 301-405-4699, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Criminology, Delinquency, and Policy

MASSACHUSETTS

American International College, Program in Criminal Justice, Springfield, MA 01109, 800-242-3142, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Law

Boston University, Metropolitan College Program in Criminal Justice, Dept. of Applied Social Science, Boston, MA 02215, 617-353-3025, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology

Harvard University, Program in CJ Policy and Management, part of Kennedy School of Government where degree is a Masters in Public Policy supported by about ten CJ elective courses, Cambridge, MA 02138, 617-495-5188, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in crime control and community policing

Northeastern University, College of Criminal Justice, Boston, MA 02115, 617-437-3327, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Criminology, Methods, and Criminalistics

Suffolk University, Sociology and Criminal Justice Dept., Boston, MA 02108, 617-573-8000, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Social Control and Counseling 

Westfield State College, CJ Dept., Westfield, MA 01086, 413-568-3311, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology and Policy

Univ. of MA at Lowell (pdf file), CJ Dept., Lowell, MA 01854, 508-934-4246, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology, Policing, and Corrections

MICHIGAN

Eastern Michigan Univ., Soc., Anthro. and Criminology Dept., Ypsilanti, MI 48197, 313-487-0012, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Criminology and Applied Sociology

Michigan St. Univ., School of Criminal Justice, East Lansing, MI 48824, 517-355-2192, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Policing and Corrections

Northern Michigan Univ., CJ Dept., Marquette, MI , 49855906-227-2660, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Policing and Security

Wayne St. University, CJ Program, Detroit, MI 48202, 313-577-2705, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology and Delinquency, not enough faculty to put together a doctoral program, but students may be able to put something together with the Depts. of Political Science or Sociology

Western Michigan Univ., Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology Dept., Kalamazoo, MI 49008, 616-387-5281, a faculty of about 18 with specialties in Criminology, Applied Sociology, and Critical Analysis. Although they are technically a sociology dept., they may have enough faculty to support CJ studies in their sociology Ph.D. program

MINNESOTA

Metropolitan State University, CJ Dept., St. Paul, MN 55106, 651-793-1300, a faculty of about 4 with specialties in Criminology, Courts, and Administration.

St. Cloud St. University, CJ Dept., St Cloud, MN 56301, 612-255-4101, a faculty of about 12 with specialties in Corrections, Policing, and Administration

MISSISSIPPI

University of Southern Mississippi, CJ Dept., Hattiesburg, MS 39406, 601-266-4509, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, and Administration

MISSOURI

Central Missouri State University, Criminal Justice Dept., Warrensburg, MO 64093, 660-5434621, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology, Policing, & Corrections

Columbia College, Criminal Justice Administration Dept., Columbia, MO 65216, 800-231-2391, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Forensics, Law, and Policy

University of Missouri
, Sociology/AJ Dept., Kansas City, MO 64110, 816-276-1597, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology and Corrections

Univ. of Missouri-St. Louis, Dept. of Crim./CJ, St. Louis, MO 63121, 314-553-5031, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Criminology and Policy

Southeast Missouri St. Univ., Dept. of Criminal Justice, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701, 573-651-2000, a faculty of about 6 with specialities in Administration, Law, and Criminology

NEBRASKA

University of Nebraska, CJ Dept., Omaha, NE 68182, 402-554-2610, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Policing, Criminology, Corrections, and Policy

NEVADA

University of Nevada -Las Vegas, CJ Dept., 4505 Maryland Pkwy., Box 455009, Las Vegas, NV 89154, 702-895-0236, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Criminology, Policy, and Policing

University of Nevada-Las Vegas, Exec. MS in Crisis and Emergency Management, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 456026, Las Vegas, NV 89154, 702-497-1216, a faculty of about 11 with specialties in disaster, terrorism, and homeland security.

University of Nevada - Reno, CJ Dept., 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV 89557, 775-1110, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology and Policy.

NEW JERSEY

College of New Jersey, Criminology & Justice Studies Dept., Ewing, NJ 08628, 609-771-2442, a faculty of about 7 with specialities in Criminology, Law, and Administration

Monmouth Univ., Criminal Justice Dept., West Long Branch, NJ 07764, 732-571-3400, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology and Delinquency

Rutgers University, School of Criminal Justice, Newark, NJ 07102, 201-648-5870, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Criminology, Criminal Law, and Administration

NEW MEXICO

New Mexico St. Univ., CJ Dept., Las Cruces, NM 88003, 505-646-3316, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology, Social Psychology, Corrections, and Criminal Law

NEW YORK

Buffalo St. Univ., CJ Dept., Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-878-4000, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology, Law and Administration

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CJ Dept., City University of New York, New York, NY 10019, 212-237-8695, a faculty of about 45 with specialties in Policing, Ethics, Forensic Science and Criminal Law

Long Island Univ. CW Post Campus, Criminal Justice Dept., Brookville, NY 11548, 516-299-2900, a faculty of about 4 with specialties in Policing and Criminology

Niagara University, CJ Dept., Niagara University, NY 14109, 716-286-8080, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Corrections, Policing, and Criminal Law

St. John's University, MA in Criminology and Justice Program, Jamaica, NY 11439, 718-990-6231, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Deviance, Delinquency, and Criminology

State University of New York, School of Criminal Justice, Albany, NY 12222, 518-442-5210, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Criminology, Law and Social Control

NORTH CAROLINA

Appalachian State University, MS in CJ & Criminology, Political Science and Criminal Justice Dept., Boone, NC 28608, 828-262-3085, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Politics, Policy, Judiciary, and Corrections

East Carolina Univ., MS in CJ, School of Social Ecology, Greenville, NC 27858, 252-328-4195, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Corrections and Law

Fayetteville State University, CJ Dept., Fayetteville, NC 23801, 910-672-1478, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Criminology, Politics, and Policy

Methodist University, MJA, Justice Studies Dept., Fayetteville, NC 28311, 910-630-7268, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Criminology, Law, Policy and Planning, Budgeting, Management, and Ethics.

North Carolina Central University, CJ Dept., Durham, NC 27707, 919-560-6280, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Policing and Corrections

North Carolina State University, Political Science and Public Administration Dept. (concentration in criminal justice), Raleigh, NC 28695, 919-515-8618 a faculty of about 23 with specialties in Management and Policy

University of North Carolina, CJ Dept. Charlotte, NC 28223, 704-547-4776, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Corrections, International Justice, Policing, and Administration

University of North Carolina, Sociology Dept. (MA in Sociology with Concentration in Criminology), Greensboro, NC 27402, 336-334-5295, a faculty of about 13 with specialties in Social Deviance, Women and Minorities

University of North Carolina, Sociology and Criminology Dept., Wilmington, NC 28403, 910-962-7749, a faculty of about 13 with specialties in Theory, Drugs, Violence, and Policy

Western Carolina University, Dept. of Applied Criminology, NC 28723, 828-227-7211, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Politics and Law

NORTH DAKOTA

Minot St. Univ., Criminal Justice Dept., Minot, ND 58707, 701-858-3000, a faculty of about 4 with specialties in Policing and Criminology

North Dakota State University, Criminal Justice and Political Science Dept., Fargo, ND 58105, 701-231-7033, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology, Corrections, and Management

University of North Dakota, Criminal Justice Dept., Grand Forks, ND 58202, 701-777-2011, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology and Victimology

OHIO

Bowling Green State University, CJ Dept., Bowling Green, OH 43403, 419-372-2531, a faculty of about 8 with 3-4 with specialties in Policing, Courts, and Corrections

Kent State University, CJ Dept., Kent, OH 44242, 216-672-2775, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Criminology, Methods, Corrections, and Victimology

University of Cincinnati, CJ Dept., Cincinnati, OH 45221, 513-556-5827, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Criminology, Methods, Corrections and Policing

University of Toledo, CJ Dept., Toledo, OH 43606, 419-530-4636, a faculty of about 13 with specialties in Policing, Penology, and Criminology

Xavier University, CJ Dept., Cincinnati, OH 45207, 513-745-3360, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Policing, Courts, and Corrections

Youngstown State University, CJ Dept.,Youngstown, OH 44555, 216-742-3279, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Corrections and Policing

OKLAHOMA

Univ. of Central Oklahoma, Sociology and CJ Dept., Edmond, OK 73034, 405-341-2980, a faculty of about 12 with specialties in Administration, Policing, and Criminology

Oklahoma City University, CJ Dept., Oklahoma City, OK 73106, 405-521-5045, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Security, Corrections and Policing

Oklahoma State University, Sociology Dept., Stillwater, OK 74078, 405-744-6105, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Criminology, Penology, and Corrections, which may be enough to support doctoral studies, even though it is technically a sociology Ph.D

OREGON

Portland State University, AOJ Dept., Portland, OR 97207, 503-725-4014, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Policy, Policing and Corrections

PENNSYLVANIA

Indiana University of PA, Criminology Dept., Indiana, PA 15705, 724-357-2720, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Criminology, Policy, Ethics, Policing and Corrections

Marywood Univ., CJ Dept., Scranton, PA 18509, 570-6211, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Criminology 

Mercyhurst College, CJ Dept., Erie, PA 16546, 814-824-2266, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Criminology, Corrections, Policing, and Intelligence Analysis

Penn. St. University, AOJ Program, University Park, PA 16802, 814-863-0078, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Criminology, Delinquency, Policy and Administration

Shippensburg Univ., CJ Dept., Shippensburg, PA 17257, 717-477-1558, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Criminology, Corrections, and Policing

St. Joseph's University, Sociology and CJ Dept., Philadelphia, PA 19131, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Criminology and Delinquency

Temple University, Criminal Justice Dept., Philadelphia, PA 19122, 215-204-7918, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Policing and Corrections

Villanova Univ., Criminal Justice Administration Program, Villanova, PA 19085, 610-519-4300, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Law and Administration

West Chester Univ., CJ Dept., West Chester, PA 19383, 610-436-2647, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Criminology, Law, and Corrections

Widener University, Criminal Justice Dept, Chester, PA 19013, 610-499-4521, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Corrections and Law

SOUTH CAROLINA

The Citadel, Dept. of Political Science & CJ (MA of Educ in Social Sci), 171 Moultrie St., Charleston, SC 29409, 803-953-5072, a faculty of about 9 with specialties in Politics, Law, and Policy

University of South Carolina, College of Criminal Justice, Columbia, SC 29208, 803-777-7097, a faculty of about 16 with specialties in Corrections, Courts, Policing and Administration

TENNESSEE

East Tennessee St. University, CJ and Criminology Dept., Johnson City, TN 37614, 423-439-6807, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, and Criminology

Univ. of Memphis, CJ Dept., Memphis, TN 38152, 901-678-2737, a faculty of about 7 with specialties in Policing, Criminal Law and Criminology

Middle Tennessee St. University, CJ Dept., Murfreesboro, TN 37132, 615-898-2111, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Administration, Policing and Criminal Law

Tennessee St. Univ., CJ Dept., Nashville, TN 37209, 615-963-5000, a faculty of about 4 with specialties in Corrections and Law

University of Tennessee, CJ Dept., Chattanooga, TN 37403, 615-755-4135, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Policy, Criminology and Criminal Law

University of Tennessee, Dept. of Sociology, Knoxville, TN 37996, 865-974-6021, a faculty of about 12 with specialties in Criminology (MA in Sociology with Concentration in Criminology)

TEXAS

Prairie View A&M Univ., College of Juvenile Justice & Psychology, Prairie View, TX 77446, 936-857-4938, a faculty of about 16 with specialties in Juvenile Justice, Psychology, and Research

Sam Houston State Univ., College of Criminal Justice, Huntsville, TX 77341, 409-294-1631, a faculty of about 30 with specialties in Corrections, Administration, Criminology, Ethics and Policing

Southwest Texas St. Univ., CJ Dept., San Marcos, TX 78666, 512-245-2174, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Corrections, Policing, Criminal Law, Ethics and Delinquency

Sul Ross St. Univ., CJ Dept., Alpine, TX, 79832, 915-837-8166, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Policing and Corrections

Tarleton State University, CJ Dept., Stephenville, TX 76402, 254-968-9024, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Administration, Policing, and Criminology

University of Houston-Clear Lake, Criminology Dept., Houston, TX 77058, 281-283-3416, a faculty of about 4 with specialties in Criminology, Policing, and Law

University of Texas at Arlington, CJ Dept., Arlington, TX 76019, 817-272-3318, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Policing, Corrections, Administration, and Criminology

UTAH

Weber St. Univ., CJ Dept., Ogden, UT 84408, 801-626-6146, a faculty of about 11 with specialties in Policing, Courts, Law, Corrections, and Forensics.

VERMONT

Castleton State College, M.A. in Psychology with a concentration in Forensics or Education, Psych. Dept., Castleton, VT 05735, 802-468-1281, a faculty of about 2 with specialties in Policing, Law and Psychology

VIRGINIA

Norfolk State University, Criminal Justice Dept., Norfolk VA 23504, 757-368-6369, a faculty of about 3 with specialties in Law, Policing, and Juvenile Justice

Old Dominion University, Sociology and CJ Dept., Norfolk, VA 23529, 757-683-3791, a faculty of about 20 with specialties in Criminology, Delinquency, and Corrections

Radford University, Criminal Justice Dept., Radford, VA 24142, 540-831-6148, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Policing, Forensics, Corrections, Law and Policy

Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Criminal Justice Dept., Richmond, VA 23284, 804-367-1050, a faculty of about 15 with specialties in Criminology, Policing, Forensic Science and Administration (site is slow to load at times)

WASHINGTON

Seattle University, CJ Dept., Seattle, WA 98122, 206-296-5477, a faculty of about 5 with specialties in Criminology, Policing, and Courts

Washington State University, Program in CJ, Pullman, WA 99164, 509-335-2545, a faculty of about 8 with specialties in Criminology, Policy and Administration, Corrections, Gender and Justice

Washington State University, CJ Program, Spokane, WA 99202, 509-358-7950, a faculty of about 4 with specialties in Judicial Evaluation, Criminology, and Policing

WEST VIRGINIA

Marshall University, CJ Dept., Huntington, WV 25755, 304-696-3196, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Criminal Law, Criminology, Policing and Policy

WISCONSIN

Marquette University, Criminology and Law Dept., Milwaukee, WI 53233, 414-288-6838, a faculty of about 6 with specialties in Criminology and Corrections

University of Wisconsin, CJ Dept., Milwaukee, WI 53201, 414-229-6030, a faculty of about 10 with specialties in Criminal Law, Criminology and Corrections

INTERNATIONAL

Criminology HamburgInstitut für Kriminologie Uni Tübingen (Germany) 

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A TYPICAL GRAD SCHOOL CURRICULUM

    Thirty-six (36) credit hours are usually required for a Master's in Criminal Justice. This includes 15 hours in core courses, 15 hours in a area of concentration, and 6 hours for a thesis or non-thesis independent research. Each course is usually 3 semester hours. Below is a typical "practitioner-oriented" curriculum with "traditional" elements.  It is what you might encounter in a recently developed program at a school which is taking the field seriously. Older and more established programs will usually have more crime-specific courses, such as "Violent Crime", "Crime in the Workplace", "White-Collar Crime", "Environmental Crime", as well as more policy and politics courses.

FIRST YEAR

 CJ Systems Applied Statistics  Research Methods Police Administration  Criminology  Behavioral Change 
CJ Administration  Management  Human Resources  CJ and the Community  Counseling Elective 

SECOND YEAR

Planning & Budgeting  Thesis or Elective Classification of Offenders Comprehensive Exams Elective Correctional Management 
Thesis  Elective Criminal Law Advanced Criminology Thesis Elective

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:
CJ 500 CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS. A foundation and overview of the criminal justice system and process, focusing on critical decision points with emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends. USUALLY REQUIRED

CJ 510 CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESEARCH METHODS. Methods and techniques of research in the behavioral sciences with emphasis on research designs most appropriate for data collection in criminal justice. USUALLY REQUIRED

CJ 520 CRIMINOLOGY. An overview of the nature and scope of delinquency and crime causation; considers problems of assessment and measurement; surveys available theoretical formulations concerning crime and delinquency. USUALLY REQUIRED

CJ 530 CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION: POLICY AND PRACTICE. Examination and analysis of basic management principles for criminal justice administration with emphasis on policy formulation and implementation. USUALLY REQUIRED

CJ 540 APPLIED STATISTICS. Introduction to statistical techniques as applied to criminal justice. Topics include descriptive statistics, point and interval estimation, statistical inference, measures of association for discrete variables, regression, & multivariate analysis. USUALLY REQUIRED

LAW ENFORCEMENT COURSES

CJ 600 ADVANCED POLICE ADMINISTRATION. Examination of principles and theories of administration applied to law enforcement organizations, emphasizing both external and internal environments, change, conflict, strategies, and management. These are analyzed in relation to the functions, structure, and policies of law enforcement agencies. SOMETIMES REQUIRED

CJ 605 HUMAN RESOURCE ADMINISTRATION. Study of legal, technical, and policy issues in personnel management related to: a) recruitment, selection, and promotion; b) career development, compensation, job analysis, performance appraisal, and measures of productivity; c) disciplinary systems and civil liability; and d) collective bargaining agreements and other labor-management issues. SOMETIMES REQUIRED

CJ 610 CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND THE COMMUNITY. Advanced study of the relationship between Justice agencies and a community's crime prevention and participation resources; the community's involvement in criminal justice policy development. SOMETIMES REQUIRED

CJ 615 CRIMINAL JUSTICE PLANNING & BUDGETING. An examination of the interactive process of planning & financial management. The development of budgeting modes in the public sector, including applications of zero-based and programmatic budgets to law enforcement agencies. The political context of criminal justice planning/budgeting as relevant to preparation, presentation, executive and legislative approval, execution, and audit. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 640 CRIME PREVENTION. An examination of the basic principles of prevention (primary, secondary, tertiary), deterrence and control of crime in the United States; analysis of CPTED and target hardening programs. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 645 PROGRAM EVALUATION. Systematic review of efforts to evaluate intervention programs and assess effectiveness of crime prevention schemes and methods for the treatment of offenders. SOMETIMES REQUIRED

CJ 650 ACCOUNTING COURSE (offered as Accounting 5xx or 6xx). An advanced accounting course relevant to public sector financial analysis. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 655 LEGAL & ETHICAL ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION. A study of legal and ethical issues involved in the administration of a modern Justice agencies. SOMETIMES REQUIRED

CJ 660 APPLIED STUDY. First hand experience in the day to day operation of a criminal justice program under the guidance and supervision of a faculty member and a practitioner in the field placement. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CORRECTIONS COURSES

CJ 620 THEORIES OF BEHAVIOR CHANGE. An examination of theories and programs related to behavioral or attitudinal change of individuals and groups as well as their application in the criminal justice system. Crime prevention, control and treatment strategies will be evaluated. OFTEN REQUIRED

CJ 625 MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION IN CORRECTIONS. Major organizational and management issues in criminal justice administration; topics include the role of professional administration in community corrections such as juvenile detention homes, house arrest, electronic monitoring, and problems of initiating reform. Includes monetary program evaluation and grants. SOMETIMES REQUIRED

CJ 630 ADVANCED COUNSELING. Major theories, principles, and techniques of individual and group processes and therapy in criminal justice. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 635 CLASSIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT OF OFFENDERS. Techniques and methods used for appraising personality characteristics. Selection, administration, interpretation, and evaluation of test instruments. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 665 ALCOHOL, DRUGS, MENTAL ILLNESS AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR. Examination of the legal, ethical, and social issues involved in criminal justice agencies dealing with alcohol and drug misuse and abuse and mental illness. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 670 GROUP TECHNIQUES. Major theories, principles, and techniques of group counseling in criminal justice. Examination of specific techniques for individual and group processes and therapy with delinquents and adult criminals. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 675 CORRECTIONS LAW. In-depth examination of a particular area within the broader field of correctional law. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 680 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN COMMUNITY BASED CORRECTIONS. Analysis of theories and practice of probation and parole. An examination of efforts to create a mixture of institutional and community setting; feasibility and effectiveness of treatment in community based settings, with emphasis on practical problems confronting probation and parole, and other community corrections officers. ELECTIVE USUALLY

CJ 685 COMMUNITY RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS. An analysis of efforts to create admixtures of institutional settings and normal community life, examining the feasibility and effectiveness of treatment under sentence in the community and residential programs used in the rehabilitative process. ELECTIVE USUALLY

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Last updated: Nov. 25, 2013
Not an official webpage of APSU, copyright restrictions apply, see Megalinks in Criminal Justice
O'Connor, T.  (2013). "Graduate Education in Criminal Justice," MegaLinks in Criminal Justice. Retrieved from http://www.drtomoconnor.com/jusgrad.htm.